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MORE: Online Dating Gets a Little Less Virtual During the speed dating event, the students were allowed to mingle and chat with one another for no longer than five minutes each.

At the end, they filled out a form indicating which people they wanted to see again, and for those who mutually agreed, contact information was exchanged.

Finkel & Eastwick (2009) set about to answer just that question with an experiment designed to test whether a potential partner’s “choosiness” was due in part to whether they were the ones doing the choosing or not.

After each date, participants rated their romantic desire and romantic chemistry for that partner, as well as how much self-confidence they felt that had on that particular “date.” The researchers found that the speed daters who approached their partners relative to those who stayed sitting would experience a greater romantic desire and chemistry toward their partners, and were more likely to respond “Yes, I would see this person again” to their partners.

But what if at least a part of that selectivity is due simply to environmental factors and social norms — factors that could be easily manipulated?

For instance, might approaching — rather than being approached — in a dating situation make individuals less selective?

But when women did the rotating, men (the ones sitting) were more selective.

Nothing else changed in the experiment, so it was the act of doing the approaching (or being approached) that helped determine a person’s selectivity toward their partner.

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  1. Pictured above are the most common type of Put and Takes. when you read words on the sides (almost always the six-sided ones) is the handle on the right or the left? solid put & takes, OR bi-level ones (very rare -- see tops #7 and #8 in the large table below). are the words/letters printed, engraved, or embossed (rare)? the particular words/letters on the sides and the order they are in. any name on the spinner (advertising name or maker's name)? -- I thank Marianne Jager, of the Netherlands, for the above picture of her ancient Put and Take spinner and the following informatrion. The top has 6 letters: A (al = take all), B (bij = add? BOTH ARE 2 1/4" TALL TO TOP OF WOOD HANDLES X 1 1/16" WIDE. I finally got a nice one on e Bay for somewhat less in March 2011. If it had landed Jack Two, it would be a pair of Jacks. Dealer said, "Bottom die reads: "Ball, Hit, Ball, Strike, Foul, Strike" Top die reads: "H. The P1 side is just the opposite: straight-flat at the bottom, and rounded at the top. This spinner is celluloid, 1-1/2," from my collection. This is a modern Put and Take (maker calls it a "spinner" and "dreidel") that I first noticed appearing on e Bay in October 2008. The one on the left weighs a very high 56 grams (2 ounces! left one: 10-sided: TAKE ONE, PUT TWO, TAKE THREE, ALL PUT, PUT FIVE, TAKE TWO, PUT ONE, TAKE ALL, PUT THREE, SPIN AGAIN. Seller said, "Game includes authentic solid brass Put'n'Take spinner (1"x1/2"), carry pouch, counters and instructions in a compact display box". "WTA" - Winner Take All: The spinner wins the whole pot! Note how the front of the replica unscrews to become a Put & Take. This tiny device (only about 1 3/16" tall x 5/8" wide; weights only .2 oz.! Perfect for any gambling, gaming, or put & take collection / display." Vintage? This small gaming device is unusual in that it is nickel plated, about 1 1/8" tall x 11/16" wide, and weights a mere .2 oz.." "NICE OLD [? 1-1/4 inches, 10 grams, non-magnetic, easy to pick up and spin, and spins very well. The dealer who sold it to me had nine of them, calls them vintage, but I wonder. Per seller: "6-sided spinner for the game "toma todo" aka "put and take." Sides are labeled in Spanish. Seller says: "Listed is an antique ( 3 in 1 ) put & take, dice & marking pencil. The clip on pencil has a put & take on one end that screws into pencil. And on the other end has a pencil point that goes in & out of the tip.? I can make out these sections: Take All (with star), P1, T3, P2, All Put, T2.... It looks like there are beads on a wire, below -- to keep score? I don't know why the store was named "Put & Take." The owner of the chip thinks it was a "general merchandise and clothing" store. If you spin the top and it gets close to the edge, it does NOT immediately tumble and stop -- rather, it just moves away from the edge and continues spinning, for the most part, and then it collapses and stops. You press down on the little red knob at the lower righrt to get the two "rotors" (wheels) to spin -- the "number rotor" (numbers 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5) and the "color rotor" (put, take and take all).